Final Fall 2012 Panel — Women in the Academy: Experiences and Strategies for Success

The USC Graduate School’s Diversity Outreach and Academic Professional Development Programs are sponsoring the final Panel of the Fall 2012 Semester: Letisha Wyatt (Advanced Doctoral Candidate, Pharmacology), Dr. Kelly Kent (Postdoctoral Research Associate), Dr. Kristan Venegas (Faculty Member in Higher Education), Dr. Andrea Armani (Faculty Member in Chemical Engineering) entitled, “Women in the Academy: Experiences and Strategies for Success” Thursday, November 8th at 3:30 p.m. in MHP 101 on the University Park Campus. This Panel provides participants with the opportunity to discuss their experiences with the panelists as well as share insights and strategies about establishing yourself as an aspiring faculty member and researcher. This presentation is focused on the experiences of women scholars but all doctoral students regardless of gender, discipline, methodological orientation, or dissertation stage are welcome.

No reservations are necessary for this presentation. You can find MHP 101 by using the USC Interactive Campus Map: http://web-app.usc.edu/maps/#upc/

If you have any questions, please email uscapdev@usce.edu

Doctoral Student Animates Research for NSF Contest

Candy Hwang, a second-year doctoral candidate in chemistry and National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research fellow, has presented her research in an offbeat manner this fall.

Hwang entered “Creating the Future,” a multimedia competition that challenges NSF fellows to express how their research may shape the future. A 90-second video created by Hwang and her team offers an animated representation of research on nitrogen.

Calling upon others at USC, she worked with a team that included students from the John C. Hench Division of Animation and Digital Arts at the USC School of Cinematic Arts and the USC Thornton School of Music.

Despite the invaluable technical help of her team, Hwang faced the obstacle of how best to represent and explain her work.

“It was very difficult to explain my research in understandable terms,” she said. In fact, the team spent two months writing and editing the storyboards for the project.

However, the long process and hard work was worth the wait.

“I got to explain science, which is such a difficult thing to do,” Hwang said. “Teaching is my favorite thing. This video was an outlet for that.”

A panel of NSF judges will select the winner from the 14 finalists, but the public also has an opportunity to vote for a People’s Choice Award.

To cast a vote in the competition, visit http://grf2012.skild.com/skild2/grf2012/viewEntryDetail.action?pid=40359

Laura Cechanowicz (editor), Simón Wilches Castro (designer/animator), Louis Morton (designer/animator) and Anna Drubich (music) provided expertise for the video. Professor Charles McKenna of the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences is Candy’s faculty adviser.

Diversity Outreach and Academic Professional Development Programs’ Final Seminars and Panel

The USC Graduate School’s Diversity Outreach and Academic Professional Development Programs want to reminder you about the final 3 Seminars and 1 Panel remaining for the Fall 2012 Semester. The offerings are as follows:

Seminars
Writing the Job Market Package: Cover Letters & Personal Statements (Wed, 10/31, 3 – 5 p.m.)

Writing the Job Market Package: Differentiating between the CV & Résumé (Wed, 11/7, 3 – 5 p.m.)

University Research Protocols & Conducting Ethical Research (Wed, 11/14, 3 – 5 p.m.)

Panel
Women in the Academy: Experiences and Strategies for Success (Thurs, 11/8, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m.)

There are spaces still available for the Seminars and Panel. If you are interested in attending any of the remaining Seminars or the Panel, please contact the Academic Professional Development program via email at uscapdev@usc.edu

Pressures to Publish in the Academy: Perspectives and Advice from Postfrom Post–Docs and Faculty MembersDocs Members

The USC Graduate School’s Diversity Outreach and Academic Professional Development Programs are sponsoring a Panel with Dr. Jody Agius Vallejo (Sociology), Dr. Jan Ahmed (Earth Science), and Dr. Marcela Cuellar (Postdoctoral Research Associate) entitled, “Pressures to Publish in the Academy: Perspectives and Advice from Post-Docs and Faculty Members” Thursday, October 25th at 3:30 p.m. in SGM 124 on the University Park Campus. This Panel draws on a wealth of experiences and knowledge to provide insights and strategies related to the need to publish as an aspiring faculty member and researcher. This presentation is applicable to all doctoral students regardless of discipline, methodological orientation, or stage of your dissertation process.

No reservations are necessary for this presentation. You can find SGM 124 by using the USC Interactive Campus Map: http://web-app.usc.edu/maps/#upc/

If you have any questions, please email uscapdev@usce.edu

USC APD & EDGE Present “Acquiring the Academic Mentoring You Need & Preparing for a Global Market”

The USC Graduate School’s Diversity Outreach and Academic Professional Development Programs are sponsoring a featured presentation by Dr. Steven Lamy entitled, “Acquiring the Academic Mentoring You Need & Preparing for a Global Market: Making the most of your experiences with USC Faculty, Advisors, and Support Programs”

Dr. Lamy will encourage you as a current doctoral student to maintain a holistic view of your professional continuum to ensure your experiences link together as you progress towards your academic and professional goals. This presentation is applicable to all doctoral students regardless of discipline, methodological orientation, or stage of your dissertation process.

Thursday, October 11th at 3:30 p.m. in MHP 101 on the University Park Campus.

No reservations are necessary for this presentation.

If you have any questions, please email uscapdev@usce.edu

 

USC Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) Honors four Ph.D. Candidates with Merit Fellowship

Photo Credit: Ronan Donovan

Every year, the USC Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) program awards Merit Fellowships to four current Ph.D. students who demonstrate excellence in their fields. Nominated for the award by their department chairs, recipients of the fellowship engage in exceptional research and are making great strides in their disciplines. The WiSE program awards the $5,000 fellowship stipend to two women from the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, and to two women from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. This year’s recipients represent the departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering.

As well as representing four distinct disciplines in science and engineering, the awardees have also come to USC from around the world. Beate Burkhart, a Chemistry Ph.D candidate, was born and raised in Germany, and earned a Master of Science dual degree in Chemistry from the Technical University of Dresden (Germany) and the Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Rennes (France). Beate joined the lab of Dr. Barry C. Thompson shortly after beginning her doctoral studies at USC. Her research focuses primarily on the synthesis, characterization and application of conjugated polymers for binary and ternary blend polymer solar cells. She is the primary author of four of the eight papers she has published, and is currently preparing several more for publication.

A native of Missouri, Jessica Hartel’s dissertation research recently took her across the globe to Uganda’s Kibale National Park for her studies on chimpanzee aggression. Jessica’s year studying aggression mitigation strategies of wild chimpanzees at Kanyawara in Kibale National Park came after more than ten years studying primates in both captive & wild environments. Her dissertation focuses on chimpanzee aggression and their post-conflict interactions, such as reconciliation, consolation, and renewed or redirected aggression. Jessica argues that the reason for the lower rates of conciliatory behavior among Kanyawara chimpanzees as opposed to captive chimpanzees is the result of increased distancing and dispersal strategies in the wild. Significantly, Jessica’s research highlights not only the importance of conflict resolution in our own social evolution, but also the possible driving factors.

Back in Los Angeles, fourth-year Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student Winnie Kam is investigating urban air pollution and its chemical characteristics. Her research into particulate matter (PM), which are particles suspended in the air usually emitted from vehicles, industrial, or agricultural activity, has the potential to make a significant impact on the health of L.A. residents. Children, seniors, and people in the vicinity of a strong source of PM are more susceptible to the adverse health effects of PM exposure. Winnie’s thesis focuses on the public’s exposure to PM in various transportation environments in L.A. including freeways, surface streets, subway, and light-rail.

Angeliki Metallinou joined USC Electrical Engineering Ph.D. program under the supervision of Dr. Shri Narayanan after completing her undergraduate degree in her hometown, Athens, Greece. Interested in multimodal signal processing, machine learning and affective computing, Angeliki’s dissertation focuses on developing computational methods to accurately model the complex processes that constitute affective expressions and interactions. She studies a variety of emotion-modulated modalities such as facial expressions, vocal characteristics, and body language gestures. Her research has many applications, including human-computer interaction and human behavior analysis. She is currently involved in projects on autism research, and recently interned at Microsoft Research investigating human-computer interaction involving spoken dialog systems.

The recipients thank the USC Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) program for the support of their dissertation research. We look forward to the many accomplishments yet to come!